Tag Archives: S-matrix

Scattering Without Scale, Or The S-Matrix In N=4

My research focuses on an unrealistic theory called massless \mathcal{N}=4 super Yang-Mills (SYM). This sounds pretty pointless, at least at first. But actually this model shares many features with more complete accounts of reality.  So it’s not all pie in the sky.

The reason I look at  SYM is because it contains lots of symmetry. This simplifies matters a lot. Studying SYM is like going to an adventure playground – you can still have great fun climbing and jumping, but it’s a lot safer than roaming out into a nearby forest.

Famously SYM has a conformal symmetry. Roughly speaking, this means that the theory looks the same at every length scale. (Whether conformal symmetry is equivalent to scale invariance is a hot topic, in fact)! Put another way, SYM has no real notion of length. I told you it was unrealistic.

This is a bit unfortunate for me, because I’d like to use SYM to think about particle scattering. To understand the problem, you need to know what I want to calculate. The official name for this quantity is the S-matrix.

The jargon is quite straightforward. “S” just stands for scattering. The “matrix” part tells you that this quantity encodes many possible scattering outcomes. To get an S-matrix, you have to assume you scatter particles from far away. That’s certainly the case in big particle accelerators – the LHC is huge compared to a proton!

But remember I said that SYM doesn’t have a length scale. So really you can’t get an S-matrix. And without an S-matrix, you can’t say anything about particle scattering. Things aren’t looking good.

Fortunately all is not lost. You can try to define an S-matrix using the usual techniques that worked in normal theories. All the calculations go through fine, unless there are any low energy particles around. Any of these so-called soft particles will cause your S-matrix to blow up to infinity!

But hey, we should expect our S-matrix to be badly behaved. After all, we’ve chosen a theory without a sense of scale! These irritating infinities go by the name of infrared divergences. Thankfully there’s a systematic way of eliminating them.

Remember that I said our SYM theory is massless. All the particles are like photons, constantly whizzing about that the speed of light. If you were a photon, life would be very dull. That’s because you’d move so fast through space you couldn’t move through time. This means that essentially our massless particles have no way of knowing about distances.

Viewed from this perspective it’s intuitive that this lack of mass yields the conformal symmetry. We can remove the troublesome divergences by destroying the conformal symmetry. We do this in a controlled way by giving some particles a small mass.

Technically our theory is now called Coulomb branch SYM. Who’s Coulomb, I hear you cry? He’s the bloke who developed electrostatics 250 years ago. And why’s he cropped up now? Because when we dispense with conformal symmetry, we’re left with some symmetries that match those of electromagnetism.

In Coulomb branch SYM it’s perfectly fine to define an S-matrix! You get sensible answers from all your calculations. Now imagine we try to recover our original theory by decreasing all masses to zero. Looking closely at the S-matrix, we see it split into two pieces – finite and infinite. Just ignore the infinite bit, and you’ve managed to extract useful scattering data for the original conformal theory!

You might think I’m a bit blasé in throwing away these divergences. But this is actually well-motivated physically. The reason is that such infinities cancel in any measurable quantity. You could say that they only appear in the first place because you’re doing the wrong sum!

This perspective has been formalized for the realistic theories as the KLN theorem. It may even be possible to get a rigorous version for our beloved massless \mathcal{N}=4 SYM.

So next time somebody tells you that you can’t do scattering in a conformal theory, you can explain why they’re wrong! Okay, I grant you, that’s an unlikely pub conversation. But stranger things have happened.

And if you’re planning to grab a pint soon, make it a scientific one!

 

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Complex Scattering For Beginners

Quantum field theory is a description of interacting particles. These are the fundamental constituents of our universe. They are real, in the sense that their properties are described by real numbers. For example, a typical particle has a momentum through spacetime described by a vector with four real components.

In my line of work we’re generally interested in finding out what happens when particles scatter. There are various rules that enable you to determine a numerical amplitude from diagrams of the process. These so-called “Feynman rules” combine the real quantities in different ways depending on the structure of the theory.

Trouble is, it can be quite tricky to do the exact calculations from these rules. It’s a bit like trying to put together a complicated piece of Ikea furniture with no idea what the end product is meant to look like! In a sense the task is possible, but you’d be hard pressed not to go wrong. Plus it would take you ages to finish the job.

What we really need is some extra pointers that tell us what we’re trying to build. Turns out that we can get that kind of information by performing a little trick. Instead of keeping all of our particle properties real, we bring in the complex numbers.

The complex numbers are like a souped up version of the real numbers. The extra ingredient is a new quantity i which squares to -1. This might all sound rather contrived at the moment, but in fact mathematically the complex numbers are a lot nicer behaved. By bringing them into play you can extract more information about your original scattering process for free!

Let’s go back to our Ikea analogy. Suppose that you get a mate in to help with the job. Your task is still the same as ever, but now as you construct it you can share tips. This makes everything easier. Moreover you can pool your guesses about what piece of furniture you’re building. The end result is still the same (hopefully!) but the extra input helped you to get there.

The Kallen-Lehmann Representation

Enough waffle, let’s get into some maths. Warning: you might find this hard going if you’re a layman! Consider the propagator of a generic (interacting) quantum field theory

\displaystyle \mathcal{A}(x,y) = \langle 0 | T \phi (x)\phi (y) | 0 \rangle

We’d like to look at it’s analytic properties as a function of the momentum p it carries. The first step is to use the standard completeness relation for the quantum states of the theory

\displaystyle \mathbf{1} = | 0 \rangle \langle 0 | + \sum_{\lambda} \int\frac{d^3p}{2(2\pi)^3E_{\mathbf{p}}(\lambda)} |\lambda_{\mathbf p}\rangle \langle \lambda_{\mathbf p} |

where |\lambda_{\mathbf{p}}\rangle is a general (possibly multiparticle) eigenstate of the Hamiltonian with momentum \mathbf{p}. Inserting this in the middle of the propagator we get

\displaystyle \mathcal{A}(x,y) = \sum_{\lambda} \int\frac{d^3p}{2(2\pi)^3E_{\mathbf{p}}(\lambda)} \langle 0 | \phi(x) |\lambda_{\mathbf p}\rangle \langle \lambda_{\mathbf p} | \phi(y) | 0 \rangle

where we have assumed that the VEV \langle \phi(x) \rangle vanishes, which is equivalent to no interactions at \infty. This is a very reasonable assumption, and in fact is a key assumption for scattering processes. (It’s particularly important in the analysis of spontaneous symmetry breaking, for example).

Now a little bit of manipulation (exercise: use the transformation of the quantities under the full Poincare group) gives us that

\displaystyle \langle 0 | \phi(x) |\lambda_{\mathbf p}\rangle = \langle 0 | \phi(0) | \lambda_{0}\rangle e^{-ip.x}|_{p_0 = E_{\mathbf{p}}}

Now substituting and introducing an integration over p_0 we get

\displaystyle \mathcal{A}(x,y) = \sum_{\lambda} D(x-y, m_{\lambda}^2)Z

where D(x-y,m_{\lambda}^2) is a Feynman propagator and Z = |\langle0|\phi(0)|\lambda_0\rangle|^2 is a renormalization factor. We’ll safely ignore Z for the rest of this post, since it doesn’t contribute to the analytic behaviour we’re interested in.

So why is this useful? One natural way to extract information from this formula might be to distinguish one-particle states. Let’s see how that helps. Recall that our states |\lambda_{\mathbf{p}}\rangle are eigenvalues of the energy-momentum operator (H, \mathbf{P}). Generically we get one-particle states of mass m arranged along a hyperboloid in energy-momentum space, due to special relativity. We also have multiparticle states of mass at least 2m forming a continuum at higher energy and momenta. (This is obvious if you consider possible vector addition of one-particle states).

Now we can use this newfound knowledge to rewrite the sum over \lambda as an isolated one-particle term, plus an integral over the multiparticle continuum as follows

\displaystyle \mathcal{A}(x,y) = D(x-y,m^2)Z + \int_{4m^2}^\infty dM^2 D(x-y, M^2)

This is starting to look promising. Transforming to momentum space is the last step we need to extract something useful. We find

\displaystyle \mathcal{A}(p^2) = \frac{iZ}{p^2-m^2} + \int_{4m^2}^{\infty}dM^2 \frac{iZ}{p^2 - M^2}

Considering the amplitude as an analytic function of the “Mandelstam variable” p^2 we find an isolated simple pole from an on-shell single particle state, plus a branch cut from multiparticle states.

It’s easy to generalize this to all Feynman diagrams. The key point is that all the analytic structure of an amplitude is encoded by the propagators. Indeed, the vertices and external legs merely contribute polarization vectors, internal symmetry factors and possibly positive factors of momentum. Singularities and branch cuts can only arise from propagators.

So what’s the big deal?

We’ve done a lot of work to extract some seemingly abstract information. But now it’s time for a substantial payoff! The analytic structure of Feynman diagrams can help us to determine their values. I won’t go into details here, but I will briefly mention one important application.

Remember that the scattering matrix in any sensible theory must conserve probabilities, and so be unitary. This requirement, coupled with our observations about Feynman diagrams tells us a lot about perturbative results. The result is usually known as the optical theorem and allows you to extract information about the discontinuities of higher loop diagrams from those at lower loops.

Still this seems rather esoteric, until you turn the whole procedure on it’s head. Suppose you are trying to guess a 1-loop amplitude. You know it’s general form perhaps, but need to fix some constants. Well from the S-matrix unitarity we know it has a branch cut and that the discontinuity is encoded by some tree level diagrams. These diagrams are essentially given by “cutting” the loop diagram.

So go ahead and compare the discontinuity you have with the product of the relevant tree diagrams. This will give you constraints on the constants you need to fix. Do this enough times, for different “cuts” and you will have fixed your 1-loop amplitude. Simple!

This method is known as generalized unitarity. It’s a vital tool in the modern amplitudes box, and has been used successfully to attack many difficult loop calculations. I’ll return to it more rigorously later, and promise to show you a genuine calculation too.

Until then, enjoy your weekend!