Why I Like Supersymmetry

Supersymmetry can be variously described as beautiful, convenient, unphysical and contrived. The truth is that nobody really knows whether we’re likely to find it in our universe. Like most theoretical physicists I hope we do, but even if we don’t it can still be a useful mathematical tool.

There are tons of reasons to like supersymmetry, as well as a good many arguments against it. I can’t cover all of these in a brief post, so I’m just going to talk about one tiny yet pretty application I glanced at today.

Let’s talk about scattering processes again, my favourite topic of (physics) conversation. These are described by quantum field theory, which is itself based on very general principles of symmetry. In the standard formulation (imaginatively called the Standard Model) these symmetries involve physical motions in spacetime, as well as more abstract transformations internal to the theory. The spacetime symmetries are responsible for giving particles mass, spin and momentum, while the internal ones endow particles with various charges.

At the quantum level these symmetries actually provide some bonus information, in the form of certain identities that scattering processes have to satisfy. These go by the name of Ward identities. For example QED has a both a gauge and a global U(1) symmetry. The Ward identity for the global symmetry tells you that charge must be conserved. The Ward identity for the gauge symmetry tells you that longitudinally polarized photons are unphysical.

If you’re a layman and got lost above then don’t worry. All you need to know is that Ward identities are cool because they tell you extra things about a theory. The more information you have, the more constrained the answer must be, so the less work you have to do yourself! And this is where supersymmetry comes into the picture.

Supersymmetry is another (very special) type of symmetry that pairs up fermions (matter) and bosons (forces). Because it’s a symmetry it has associated Ward identities. These relate different scattering amplitudes. The upshot is that once you compute one amplitude you get more for free. The more supersymmetry you have, the more relations there are, so the easier your job becomes.

So what’s the use if supersymmetry isn’t true then? Well, in general terms it’s still useful to look at these simplified situations because it might help us discover tools that would be hard to uncover otherwise. Take the analogy of learning a language, for example. One way to do it is just to plunge headlong in and try to pick things up as you go along. This way you tend to get lots of everyday phrases quickly, but won’t necessary understand the structure of the language.

Alternatively you can go to classes that break things down into simpler building blocks. Okay spending one hour studying the subjunctive alone might not seem very useful at first, but when you go back to having a real conversation you’ll pick up new subtleties you never noticed before.

If you’re still unconvinced here’s a (somewhat trivial) concrete example. Recall that you can show that purely positive helicity gluon amplitudes must vanish at tree level in QCD. The proof is easy, but requires some algebraic fiddling. The SUSY Ward identity tells us immediately than in a Super-Yang-Mills (SYM) theory this amplitude must vanish to all orders in the loop expansion. So how do we connect back to QCD?

Well the gluon superpartners (gluinos) have quadratic coupling to the gluon, so an all gluon scattering amplitude in SYM can’t include any gluinos at tree level. (Just think about trying to draw the diagram if you’re confused)! In other words, at tree level the SYM amplitude is exactly the QCD amplitude, which proves our result.

Not sure what will be on the menu tomorrow – I’m guessing that either color-ordering or unitarity methods will feature. Drop me a comment if you have a preference.

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2 thoughts on “Why I Like Supersymmetry”

  1. Wow. Just wow. Thanks for following WordBowlbyMsCharlieS.com (hope to see a word from you), and thanks for forcing my brain to work today. I’m voting for color-ordering…

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